Pickled & Deviled Eggs

red beetCall it bar food if you want but they still rock and are great to have anytime.

Fresh eggs (when the yolk stands proud vs flat older egg yolks) are tougher to peel. I prefer to buy eggs and let them sit in the fridge for 10-14 days before boiling them but if you insist, there is a better way and it works so well, you will  never peel an egg again.

Egg boiling \ peeling instructions:

DON’T FORGET THE BAKING SODA! – This works well for any egg, old or fresh.

*  I don’t bother with 2″ of water above the eggs. As long as the whole egg is just about covered, it will boil much faster (reduce heat to a simmer once boiling). Heating all of that extra water is a waste of energy and time.

Ingredients: (easily scaled up)

12 large eggs
1 ( 15 or16 oz) can sliced pickled red beets, UNDRAINED
1/4 cup water
1/3 cup cider vinegar (Try my DIY Vinegars)
1/2 cup brown sugar (or white)
1/2 cup diced onion

Optional:

 1 tsp black pepper corns

Directions:

  1. bring all the ingredients, except the eggs, to a boil,
  2. reduce the heat and simmer for 5 minutes. 
  3. Pack no more than one dozen peeled, hard-cooked eggs loosely into a warm, pre-sanitized quart jar (or other similar size container which can be closed tightly). 
  4. There needs to be plenty of pickling solution, and enough to completely cover the eggs.  Pour the hot pickling solution over the eggs in the jar, cover, and
  5. refrigerate immediately.

NOTE:pep eggs

After making the eggs, they will require some time to season (i.e., pick up the flavors from the pickling brine). Keep them refrigerated at all times. If small eggs are used, 1 to 2 weeks are usually allowed for seasoning to occur.  Medium or large eggs may require 2 to 4 weeks to become well seasoned.  Use the eggs within 3 to 4 months for best quality.

Small to medium eggs work the best (surface area ration to volume for flavor).

Peperoncini Pickled Eggs:peperoncini

Usually I buy a jar of Cento brand (my favorite) peperoncini and eat most of them leaving less than 20% of the peppers.

I then add the heated juice (just like the Red Beet eggs) after I fish out the remaining peppers that I add back into the mix once I pour the heated juice over the eggs after it cools back down to room temp.

This keeps the peppers from getting soggy and turning white. Trust me, they suck if boiled. The reason I leave some peppers in the jar is because I prefer to scoop out a pepper now and again with my pickled egg snack. You can use just juice, sans eggs if you like.

Some variations that I have yet to try out:

Deviled Red Beet Egg Filling recipe:deviled

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard (or stone ground)
1 tablespoon mayonnaise
1/2 teaspoon Paprika or Curry powder (your preference)
1 tablespoon vinegar
2 tablespoons olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste
Fresh rosemary for garnish

Red Beet filling on white egg recipe:Beet-Deviled-Eggs-JBG

* 4-5 small beets (canned)
* 12 eggs, hard boiled and peeled
* ½ cup mayo
* 4 tablespoons dijon mustard
* 2 teaspoons lemon juice
* 1-2 teaspoons garlic powder
* 1-2 teaspoons onion powder
* Pinch cayenne
* Kosher salt and black pepper
* Green onions (or chives), sliced very thin

Place the beets in an oven safe dish 
Cut the eggs in half and carefully remove the yolks to a bowl. Reserve the whites.
Place the beets in a food processor and puree until smooth. Add the egg yolks, mayo, dijon, lemon juice, garlic powder, onion powder, and cayenne. Season well with salt and black pepper and mix well until yolks are broken up and ingredients are evenly incorporated and smooth.
Spoon yolk mixture into reserved egg white halves. Sprinkle with the green onions and serve chilled.